Cold Test Results (~22°C Ambient)

For the testing of PSUs, we are using high precision electronic loads with a maximum power draw of 2700 Watts, a Rigol DS5042M 40 MHz oscilloscope, an Extech 380803 power analyzer, two high precision UNI-T UT-325 digital thermometers, an Extech HD600 SPL meter, a self-designed hotbox and various other bits and parts. For a thorough explanation of our testing methodology and more details on our equipment, please refer to our How We Test PSUs - 2014 Pipeline post.

The efficiency of the Hydro PTM Pro meets the 80Plus Platinum certification requirements when it is powered from an 115 VAC source. When powered by a 230 VAC input, the efficiency is increased by an average of 1.9%, yet that is not enough to reach the 80Plus Platinum efficiency requirements for 230 VAC devices. The average nominal load efficiency (20% to 100% of the unit's capacity) is 92.6% with the unit powered from a 230 VAC source, and drops down to 90.7% if the unit is powered by a 115 VAC source. What is interesting is the very low load efficiency, which seems to be rather poor.

We performed our thermal testing with the ECO mode disabled, meaning that the fan was always on, regardless of the load. Nevertheless, the noise output of the Protechnic Electric fan is very low while the load is below 500 Watts, ensuring that the PSU will remain quiet while the system is idling or performing menial tasks. Furthermore, the internal temperatures of the Hydro PTM Pro 1200W unit are relatively low, especially considering the small heatsinks of the unit.

FSP Hydro PTM Pro 1200W: Inside & Out Hot Test Results (~45°C Ambient)
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  • ballsystemlord - Thursday, April 21, 2022 - link

    I'm assuming desktop HDDs "ramp-down" when not in use. So they'll then need to ramp-up when the system is running and the CPU+GPU is more loaded down.

    I can't really say if the various GPUs go to full power when first powered on, or if they go into an idle state. It's safer to assume a higher power draw than underestimate things IMHO.
    Reply
  • dqniel - Friday, April 22, 2022 - link

    Who uses 5 METERS of RGB strip in their PC? Even if you went with that crazy amount of RGB, a normal kit uses about 5 watts per meter. That's only ~25W, not 220W. Reply
  • Samus - Wednesday, April 20, 2022 - link

    Someone mentioned this last time an FSP Hydro PSU was reviewed, and it still sticks out in my mind that naming an electronic power supply with a liquid acronym sends shivers down my spine :) Reply
  • meacupla - Wednesday, April 20, 2022 - link

    hydro not only applies to water based fluids, but also oil based fluids. Like hydraulic systems typically use mineral oils with additives that reduce corrosion, and wear. Reply
  • Sivar - Wednesday, April 20, 2022 - link

    To me, it implies "water cooled", like the EVGA FTW HYDRO series of graphics cards.
    This leads me to wonder: Why would a power supply need liquid (whether oil or water) cooling?
    Reply
  • Slash3 - Wednesday, April 20, 2022 - link

    FSP has actually produced a few water cooled versions (including a similar 1200W) over the years under the Hydro nameplate.

    https://www.anandtech.com/show/12411/fsp-liquid-co...

    There have been a few others that have done so (Koolance, DeepCool, etc), but none of them were particularly popular for obvious reasons.
    Reply
  • Oxford Guy - Thursday, April 21, 2022 - link

    Is this all these companies can do now — use undersized heat sinks and blast the fan to compensate?

    The noise level is unacceptable. It’s bait and switch. Advertise a high wattage but make the product so loud for anything approaching that capacity as to make it worthless. This is just like the UPS that claims sine wave output but which is incapable of actual sine waves above 25% output.

    Scams upon scams upon scams. It’s extremely tiresome.
    Reply
  • meacupla - Thursday, April 21, 2022 - link

    If you stick in an oversized heatsink, what you end up doing is killing all the airflow. Making heat pockets where the hot air doesn't get flushed out is worse, despite the extra cost from a bigger heatsink. Reply
  • flyingpants265 - Thursday, April 21, 2022 - link

    I think you missed the point.. Reply
  • m16 - Wednesday, May 18, 2022 - link

    This is a really tempting PSU, provided its long term reliability is good.

    During this pandemic it has been hard to get higher power PSUs at a decent price, and while this is on the higher end of pricing, the specs sorta justify it.

    I would get it in a heart beat if I can't get anything else as it future-proofs GPUs.
    Reply

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